Monday, August 14, 2017

OSHA to Hold Second Public Meeting to Solicit Suggestions for Growing, Strengthening Voluntary Protection Programs



The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will hold the second of two meetings Aug. 28, 2017, in New Orleans, LA, to continue the discussion on the future direction of the agency’s Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP). The discussion will include a review of the July 17, 2017, meeting along with comments and suggestions from the public on potential avenues for action.
OSHA is seeking to reshape VPP so that it continues to represent safety and health excellence, leverages partner resources, further recognizes the successes of long-term participants, and supports smart program growth. OSHA invites stakeholders to provide new ideas on three broad categories which include:
·       Overall VPP process and flow;
·       Corporate/long-term participant involvement; and
·       Special Government Employee activities.
The meeting will be held Aug. 28, 1 to 4 p.m. in Great Hall B of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. To attend, please register by Aug. 23, 2017. Attendees can choose from several levels of participation in the discussion, which will cover general guidelines and key issues that were raised in public comments. The comment period closes Sept. 15, 2017.
OSHA adopted the VPP on July 2, 1982; the program emphasizes cooperative action among government, industry, and labor to address worker safety and health issues and expand worker protection.
Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

Friday, August 11, 2017

New and revised resources available from OSHA on silica final rule



OSHA has released two resources to help small business employers comply with the agency’s final silica rule. The Small Entity Compliance Guide for General Industry and Maritime outlines steps that employers are required to take including: assessing worker exposures; using engineering and work practice controls to keep exposures below a specified safety threshold; offering medical exams to certain highly exposed workers; and training workers. Enforcement of the final rule is scheduled to begin June 23, 2018.
Released earlier in the year, the Small Entity Compliance Guide for Construction describes requirements to protect employees including: using engineering controls specified in the standard or selecting other effective engineering controls to reduce exposures; offering medical exams to workers who will need to wear a respirator under the silica standard for 30 or more days a year; and training workers. The guide was updated to reflect the new enforcement date of Sept. 23, 2017.  

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

CSC Classes

Two links to finding the classes you want.

Current class calendar with month.

The next month classes available.

Construction Safety Council
4415 W. Harrison St, Suite 404,
Hillside, IL 60162
   
800.552.7744
708-449-8600

Sunday, July 30, 2017

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form



The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.
The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.
“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”
In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.
OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.
Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Behavior- Based Safety - Tool Box Talks

Overview
There are many different views of behavior-based safety. Some consultants’ concepts are based on research; some are based on common sense. Some say behavior-based safety is all you need; others say it’s only part of the safety effort needed. Some say reinforcement is the answer; others say there are not enough opportunities for reinforcement in the workplace.
But, however your organization looks at it, behavior-based safety is the process of focusing on behavior to prevent/reduce occupational injuries.

Why should your company use behavior-based safety?
• Statistics reveal that 80% to 95% of incidents are caused by at-risk behavior.
• The frequency of injuries can be reduced.
• The entire workforce can participate in the process.
• Safety teams make safety improvements.
• Behavior-based safety requires progressive and proactive thinking.
• When added to a safety program already attempting to comply with regulations, behavior-based safety shows "good faith."

Key elements of behavior-based safety
• Employee/management involvement.
• Identification of safe and at-risk behavior.
• Observation.
• Feedback.
• Intervention (instructional, motivational, or supportive).

What must I do?
• As an employee who is concerned with safety, you can participate in the company safety program. Follow the work rules and processes that the company develops.
• Use all supplied personal protective equipment.
• Cooperate with the safety manager, superintendent or safety committee if they observe you at your workplace, or if they request information from you on how you work.

This information is provided by: Assurance Agency

Monday, July 24, 2017

OSHA and NIOSH team up to offer updated heat safety app



The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and OSHA have collaborated to update OSHA’s original Heat Safety Tool. The updated app, available for both Android and iPhone, provides a clearer user interface, while still providing the same information to help keep workers safe when working outdoors in hot weather. Extreme heat causes more deaths than any other weather-related hazard; each year more than 65,000 people seek medical treatment for extreme heat exposure.

Employers should encourage workers exposed to hot and humid conditions to use the app to check the heat index and relevant protective measures. The app displays the heat index in the user’s location and shows the current risk level. The app also forecasts the hourly heat index throughout the entire workday, giving employers information they can use to adjust the work environment as needed to protect workers.

More than 450,000 users have downloaded the original app since it was launched in 2011. The original OSHA app will no longer function after September 30. To download the updated app and get more information on OSHA’s efforts to help protect workers from the heat, visit our heat campaign webpage.

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Saturday, July 15, 2017

OSHA launches application to electronically submit injury and illness data on August 1



The Occupational Safety and Health Administration will launch on Aug. 1, 2017, the Injury Tracking Application (ITA). The Web-based form allows employers to electronically submit required injury and illness data from their completed 2016 OSHA Form 300A. The application will be accessible from the ITA webpage.
Last month, OSHA published a notice of proposed rulemaking to extend the deadline for submitting 2016 Form 300A to Dec. 1, 2017, to allow affected entities sufficient time to familiarize themselves with the electronic reporting system, and to provide the new administration an opportunity to review the new electronic reporting requirements prior to their implementation. 
The data submission process involves four steps: (1) Creating an establishment; (2) adding 300A summary data; (3) submitting data to OSHA; and (4) reviewing the confirmation email. The secure website offers three options for data submission. One option will enable users to manually enter data into a web form. Another option will give users the ability to upload a CSV file to process single or multiple establishments at the same time. A third option will allow users of automated recordkeeping systems to transmit data electronically via an application programming interface.
The ITA webpage also includes information on reporting requirements, a list of frequently asked questions and a link to request assistance with completing the form.
Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.
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